• Fifty Squared Art Prize

    Fifty Squared Art Prize

    In June 2021 I won the Brunswick Street Gallery Fifty Squared Art Prize for my piece ‘Exhibit’.

    Statement by Kimberley Moulton, Senior Curator South Eastern Aboriginal Collections, Museums Victoria, who judged the prize.


    Brunswick Street Gallery is pleased to announce the First Prize winner as Jarrad Martyn for his painting Exhibit. 

    Of this work, esteemed judge Kimberley Moulton said in a statement:
    I was instantly taken by this painting by Jarrad Martyn titled ‘Exhibit’ both for its exquisite painterly qualities and captivating subject matter.

    Drawn in by the plumes of white matter into what looks like a gallery space you could be in any museum or art gallery in the world, from the NGV to the Met there is no clue to the geography of place however the universal experience of a museum and also the increasing presence of deep cleaning and people in hazmat suits are unfortunately no longer a foreign occurrence. The use of oil paint and warm colour creates a soft glow that emanates from the work, perhaps its early morning or late in the evening. Although the presumed cleaning of the gallery is taking place COVID-19 is not necessarily the subject matter here, I read themes of issues that are pertinent to our world today, health of people, the deconstruction of colonial institutions and monuments, the feelings of isolation and contemplation in a world that has dramatically changed in a short period of time. The empty frame perhaps alluding to the removal of a work, we are left to wonder why. The monument behind the human figure on the mounted horse both looks to be cast with a shadow from the dull light of the room but potentially could also be seen as splashed with red paint. Is this a deep clean for the disease of racism in these spaces or the smoking white chemical symbolic of the whitewash of history that so often permeates the art and cultural histories of institutions? There is an emptiness or a feeling of aloneness here, the empty chairs, the missing work, the figure alone and looking downwards concentrating hard at the job at task, but pushing onwards – feelings of what we have felt much of in recent times. When reading this work it inspires many questions, conceptually it is dynamic and although we may not understand the narrative from the outset, it is relatable in many ways. 

    Congratulations Jarrad on your work which holds a great depth of ideas and beautifully realised in your chosen medium.

    – Kimberley Moulton, Senior Curator South Eastern Aboriginal Collections, Museums Victoria, who judged the prize.

    https://www.brunswickstreetgallery.com.au/fifty-squared-2021-winners

  • ‘Relics’, Linden New Art Project Space, St Kilda VIC

    ‘Relics’, Linden New Art Project Space, St Kilda VIC

    In May of 2021 I relocated to Melbourne, VIC where I am busy preparing works for two solo exhibitions late in the year. The series I’ve been working on for these shows explore the evolution of collective memory, and the function of public monuments in modern society.

    ‘Relics’, Linden New Art Project Space, St Kilda VIC- 30th Sept - 30th Oct 2021

    ‘X’, Brunswick Street Gallery, Fitzroy VIC - 18th Nov - 5th Dec 2021

  • Painting the Screen at Nyisztor Studio

    Painting the Screen at Nyisztor Studio

    I exhibited some works on canvas in the group show Painting the Screen, curated by Shannon McCulloch and Tanya Jaceglav at Nyisztor Studio. Photo courtesy of Tim Palman.

  • Collie Progress Image 1

    Collie Progress Image 1
  • Collie Progress Image 2

    Collie Progress Image 2
  • Collie Progress Image 3

    Collie Progress Image 3
  • Collie Progress Image 4

    Collie Progress Image 4
  • Collie Progress Image 5

    Collie Progress Image 5
  • 2020

    2020

    After my 2020 solo exhibition ‘Its Not Down in Any Map; True Places Never Are’, the world stopped - I was booked to do several workshops, murals, and residencies across Australia, and in Europe, which were all cancelled due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Due to these cancellations, I ended up focusing more on murals for the second half of the year, including painting walls in regional parts of Western Australia, namely Newman and Collie. The Newman project was organised by Acure Asset Management for the Newman Hotel, and the Collie project (The Collie Mural Trail) was organised by the Premier’s Department, the Shire of Collie, and SIXTWOTHREEZERO.

  • ‘It is Not Down in Any Map; True Places Never Are', Stala Contemporary, West Perth WA

    ‘It is Not Down in Any Map; True Places Never Are', Stala Contemporary, West Perth WA

    Jarrad Martyn: ‘It is not down in any map; true places never are’
    Stala Contemporary 12 February - 6 March 2020


    Jarrad Martyn is a painter! In his recent work, he has honed his skills to interrogate his lived experience in a world of complexity, frustration, and possibility. Whether in large-scale murals or studio paintings, Martyn involves his audience in a conversation about what it means to be an engaged participant in this world. Faced with seemingly inexplicable contradictions and a planet in crisis, he offers a place for rumination.

    Although he provides no easy answers or obvious solutions, he does open up a space for pondering. Embracing the words of his artistic mentor and countryman[ Jarrad Martyn was born in Aberdeen, Scotland, in 1991], Peter Doig, he adopts the stance that painting is a process inextricably linked to pondering, both as a methodology and as an objective. As a result, he slowly documents his complex thought experiments into paintings that have a long fuse, which feeds doubt, encourages conjecture, and prompts his viewers to re-evaluate their position.

    Paintings have always chronicled the human condition. From the earliest ochre images applied to cave walls, they are — if any good — about ideas and how to see and how to interpret what we see. The long history of painting provides context and resonance, meshing past and present with possible futures. It is there to be mined, referenced, and evoked. It is there for the stealing, as Adrian Ghenie contends: “I steal from everybody. [ Quoted in Judd Tully, ‘How Adrian Ghenie conquered the art market The Romanian painter’s prices have increased 160-fold over the past decade. But who, or what, is behind this steep rise?’ The Art Newspaper, 22nd June 2018 09:39 GMT
    ]” So does Jarrad Martyn, most notably from the corpus of Australian art history. His favourite sources are Tom Roberts, Arthur Streeton, and Frederick McCubbin, but everyone is fair game.

    Positioning himself within history, Martyn suggests a continuity of thought that resonates across centuries. These stolen figures amble into Beautiful Mountain Alpha and look quizzically at our blundering. On Montebello Island, a Red Coat soldier tips his three-cornered hat to three local workers, wearing only shorts. They are inflating a weather balloon that will rise into the looming devastation of an atomic explosion. The mushroom cloud generated by Operation Hurricane (the first British atomic test in October 1952) morphs into Auguste Rodin’s Gates of Hell, hovering in a sulphurous sky. In a world in which Donald Trump, Hassan Rouhani and Kim Jong-un posture and threaten those gates remain wide open while we continue our menial tasks, with a nod from the past. It is a chilling image, made more so by its sublime beauty, its calm detachment, and its refusal to be didactic.

    Martyn’s pondering, on what has been, what might have been, what could be, operates in a Surrealist dream-scape where time and events seamlessly fuse. His technical virtuosity facilitates that fusion, prompting our response as we enter into the reconstructed narrative of his free-flowing musings. The crisply delineated figures, the bold application of paint, the soft stains, scrapings, and impasto accretions hold our attention. Each brush mark is descriptive and expressive at the same time. In that space, we join in his reverie, struck by an awesome beauty where Rodin and the atomic cloud, British Red-coats and a 1950’s workforce, beauty and terror enmesh.

    Paranoia, from 2019, brings the artist into our field of vision. In his studio — a nebulous arena invaded by the surrounding landscape — he painstakingly constructs the image we are now reading. Nannup devastated by fire looms up from the canvases arranged around the studio walls, or perhaps bleeds into them. Sidney Nolan’s Ned Kelly mask is a studio prop, along with Damien Hirst’s shark in formaldehyde The Physical Impossibility of Death in the Mind of Someone Living. The history of painting in Australia has served many nationalistic purposes, none more so that the Impressionism of Tom Roberts and Arthur Streeton and the mythologising of Sidney Nolan, but Martyn questions whether these artists have impacted on our behaviour? As Australia burns and vast tracks of land are turned to ash, devastating lives and destroying ecosystems, what role can art play? Hirst’s shark has an impact on viewers, but what of the shark? The paranoia of the artist is fed by these questions, which in turn filters into our consciousness as we engage with his painting.

    Every artist, when confronted with a blank canvas, has first to establish their modus operandi. How to make a painting? What does it require, how will they embed their narrative in the process of applying pigment suspended in medium to a flat surface? For Martyn, technical proficiency is fundamental. He has a commitment to figuration, telling stories, and to embedding his practice in history and within the history of art. The surface is the entry point for the viewer, it must be seductive, but that level of seduction must be balanced with the capacity to carry his ideas; and his interests are wide. He can list countless species of turtles and varieties of coral. He is passionate about the Tesla Cybertruck and the places he has visited and intends to visit. He quotes the Leipzig School as an influence (Neo Rauch and Adrian Ghenie), and also Peter Doig and his teachers from Curtin University. He is articulate and knowledgeable; full of ideas!

    Perhaps surprisingly, the process starts on his computer, in Photoshop, as he gathers images and curates threads of ideas into a bricolage of new meanings. This ‘drawing’ is then migrated to the canvas through a hand-gridding process that allows him to claim ownership and permits modification and assimilation. He juxtaposes his carefully transcribed photograph of a brace of Antelope and a cased skeleton at the Academy of Taxidermy in Guildford with a photograph of his illuminated tent from a recent camping trip to Coral Bay. Simultaneously beautiful and ominous, his stream of consciousness narrative in Watcher positions his direct experience with nature with the alienation of the museum-goer to reflect upon our relationship with the natural world. These disparate images coalesce in a magical union that underscores his peregrination.

    In Collective Imagination, Martyn reflects on Yuval Noah Harari’s theory that Homo sapiens rule the world because we are the only creatures that can believe in things that exist purely in our imagination, and those universal myths of nationhood, religion, and money have led us to this current crisis in the management of our most precious resource, our planet. Within the conceptual and tactile realm of painting, myriad references can challenge, appease, confront, and coalesce simultaneously. From a magic realist flow of ideas, Martyn positions a group of scientists taking an ice-core sample — a long-term record of our impact on the earth — but he sets it within the desert and the Pinnacles north of Perth. As the Moon comes crashing into sight, the drilling rig is transmuted into a cross; of sacrifice or salvation? There are no easy answers here. Instead, the artist is framing a series of questions and pondering on how painting can contribute to the contemporary conversation around climate change.

    All the works in this current exhibition are part of that wider conversation about humanity's relationship with our natural environment. Jarrad Martyn is, like Ishmael in Herman Melville’s Moby Dick, asserting that what is essential about a place is rarely found on a map. Instead, it is discovered by a deep engagement and earnest interrogation of that place, cognisant of all that has come before, all that is documented, but open to new interpretations.

    It is why these very beautiful paintings are worthy of our reflection. They are a version of the contemporary sublime in which terror and beauty tip on the fulcrum of our imagination. And that is how we should approach these paintings, as a portal into knowingness, an invitation to join the artist in an open conversation about the critical issues facing us all in the first decades of the 21st century. This is not an unproblematic mission, but it is a vitally important one!

    Professor Ted Snell AM CitWA
    Chief Cultural Officer
    Director Lawrence Wilson Art Gallery

    1. Jarrad Martyn was born in Aberdeen, Scotland, in 1991
    2. Quoted in Judd Tully, ‘How Adrian Ghenie conquered the art market The Romanian painter’s prices have increased 160-fold over the past decade. But who, or what, is behind this steep rise?’ The Art Newspaper, 22nd June 2018 09:39 GMT

  • City of Perth Cultural Collections acquisition.

    City of Perth Cultural Collections acquisition.

    My painting Haze recently became apart of the City of Perth Cultural Collections.

    Haze, 2019. Oil on canvas, 183 x 150 cm.

    The painting Haze explores the relationship between urban and rural communities as the natural environment changes. Global warming is marked by an increase in extreme weather events - A fire-fighter attempts to hose down several flood damaged cars, as some distant figures interact over a boiling billy. The predicament facing the fire-fighter is symbolic of the current indecision and anxiety that many individuals are feeling towards climate inaction. Namely our inability to meet the targets outlined by the Paris Agreement (2015).Society is becoming much more aware of how individual daily actions affect the whole ecosystem.

    The figures within the painting are artists themselves, taken from the painting The Artist Camp (1886) by Tom Roberts. By placing the camping artists within the scene, Haze questions what painting can offer to the conversation in this changing situation. It also aims to acknowledge the adaptability and sustainability of past generations - How humans have become more reliant on material possessions and technology as time has passed. This sense of insistent consumerism is reflected by the plastic blow-up Kangaroo in the foreground; nature becoming artificial in our desire for increased capital and economic growth, and the increase in disposable and single-use items.

    Characteristics of the Heidelberg School of Painting, such as the isolated cottage, rolling hills, and dense foliage, have become symbolic representations of what Australians consider a rural landscape. Using source images taken from a rural property in Nannup in South West WA, these characteristics are juxtaposed against the looming skyscrapers of the Perth city Central Business District. These buildings suggest a level of control over the future of our relationship with the environment, big business, and each other. Some of the effects of these relationships will be experienced through changes in the weather, shown in Haze by sections of the sky and the wider composition being broken up by shapes and hues derived from weather forecast graphics.

  • St.John of God Health Care Art Collection Acquisition

    St.John of God Health Care Art Collection Acquisition

    My painting Paranoia was recently acquired by the St.John of God Health Care Art Collection.

    Paranoia, 2020. Oil on canvas, 93 x 89 cm.

    Here is what Ted Snell wrote about the work in his essay:

    Paranoia, from 2019, brings the artist into our field of vision. In his studio — a nebulous arena invaded by the surrounding landscape — he painstakingly constructs the image we are now reading. Nannup devastated by fire looms up from the canvases arranged around the studio walls, or perhaps bleeds into them. Sidney Nolan’s Ned Kelly mask is a studio prop, along with Damien Hirst’s shark in formaldehyde The Physical Impossibility of Death in the Mind of Someone Living. The history of painting in Australia has served many nationalistic purposes, none more so that the Impressionism of Tom Roberts and Arthur Streeton and the mythologising of Sidney Nolan, but Martyn questions whether these artists have impacted on our behaviour? As Australia burns and vast tracks of land are turned to ash, devastating lives and destroying ecosystems, what role can art play? Hirst’s shark has an impact on viewers, but what of the shark? The paranoia of the artist is fed by these questions, which in turn filters into our consciousness as we engage with his painting.

    Ted Snell, 2020

  • Residency at Art on the Move

    Residency at Art on the Move
  • Residency at Art on the Move

    Residency at Art on the Move

    I was lucky enough to have a residency at Art on the Move in Fremantle, where I completed works for my upcoming solo show at Stala Contemporary.

  • Loveliest tints of Azure

    Loveliest tints of Azure

    My painting Loveliest tints of Azure recently became part of the City of Swans art collection.

  • Shire of Mundaring Acquisition

    Shire of Mundaring Acquisition

    My drawing Land was recently acquired by the Shire of Mundaring.

  • University of WA Acquisition

    University of WA Acquisition

    My painting Plan was recently acquired by the University of WA (UWA).

  • Murals

    Murals

    This year I've increased the focus on murals as one of my main artistic disciplines. I've painted walls for the Town of East Fremantle, City of Vincent, City of South Perth and Shire of Dandaragan.

  • John Stringer Prize

    John Stringer Prize

    I was awarded this years John Stringer Prize for my oil painting Range. Thanks to the Collectors Club of Western Australia, John Curtin Gallery, The Kerry Stokes collection and curator Kate Alida Mullen.

    The oil painting Range explores the human impact on the natural environment during the anthropocene, the proposed epoch steaming from the Industrial Revolution marked by great change to the Earths geology and ecosystems.

    The setting for Range is the 1866 painting of Wannon Falls in Victoria by Russian artist Nicholas Chevallier. A boat of rescue workers are paddling towards a boat of hi vi’s wearing workers situated at the base of the waterfall. The imagery is taken from Cyclone Tasha which was a primary cause of the Brisbane floods from 2010-2011. Climate changes encompasses a number of consequences including extreme weather events resulting from a rise in temperature. The marks used to depict the rescue workers are characterised by a busyness to suggest a sense of motion, in contrast to the workers ahead who appear calm and oblivious to the fire rising from the boat. Positioned between the two boats is a giant mega fauna goanna called a Megalania and two 18th century British red coat soldiers. Their placement is symbolic and acknowledges the history of global warming, which has occurred both naturally and through human impact.

    The workers are about to be engulfed by the waterfall, like the Megalania which went extinct during the Pleistocene period as a result of both environmental changes and human hunting. The two solders contemplating the workers fate, reference the Industrial Revolution, which started in 1760, with the new manufacturing processes resulting from the burning of fossil fuels being the point of origin for the significant spike of CO2 levels into the atmosphere. The force of the water from the waterfall would keep the various mine and rescue workers in a state of limbo, never quite reaching each other, asking the question of how much human impact is sustainable while also acknowledging the past periods of natural warming and cooling of the landscape which have occurred during past epochs.

    The patches of colour spread across the composition are derived from a weather forecast map.Combined with the blurring and softening of paint a dream like space that slips in-between real and imagined is created, encouraging the audience to understand the significant role that time plays in understanding this framing of the landscape.

    Image courtesy of the John Curtin Gallery.

  • Midland Junction Art Centre residency

    Midland Junction Art Centre residency

    I recently completed a three month long residency at the Midland Junction Art Centre. The residency centred upon paintings and drawings which explored the human impact on the natural environment during the anthropocene, the proposed epoch steaming from the Industrial Revolution marked by great change to the Earths geology and ecosystems. Aesthetically I've being trying to increase the role of colour in my paintings, shifting away from an analogous colour scheme. The colour schemes have derived from imagery which conceptually relates to the shifting landscape resulting from global warming, such as weather chart graphics.

  • Guildford Grammar School Commission

    Guildford Grammar School Commission

    I was recently commissioned by the P & C department at Guildford Grammar School to complete a large painting that responded to one of the subjects taught at the school.

  • Edith Cowan University Acquisition

    Edith Cowan University Acquisition

    A detail shot of my painting We're going to need a bigger boat that was recent;y acquired by ECU for their collection.

  • Shire of Dandaragan

    Shire of Dandaragan

    My painting Turbo Theater from my 2016 solo show Abando at The Butcher Shop in Northbridge is now in the Shire of Dandaragan Art Collection.

    Turbo Theater
    2016
    Oil on Canvas
    45 x 58 cm

  • City of Joondalup

    City of Joondalup

    My drawing Markers and painting Territory won the 2017 Joondalup Community Invitation Art Award for Excellence and Overall acquisitive award.

    What the judges said of Territory: The painting is intense with violence and yet, it is quiet. The machine hacking into the tree is brutal. There is an acknowledgement of colonisation, represented through a well-researched journey into local history however the artist brings these to light in a way that is nuanced and contemporary. The palette allows the artist to add and subtract, developing many layers of darkness and shadow, and in so doing, he does not allow us to ignore the darkness and awareness of our history

    https://www.perthnow.com.au/community-news/joondalup-times/martyns-territory-makes-its-mark-at-city-of-joondalup-community-invitation-art-award-c-828805

  • City of Joondalup Community Invitation Art Award

    City of Joondalup Community Invitation Art Award
  • PICA Residency

    PICA Residency

    I had a six week residency at PICA in the middle of 2017, it was beneficial receiving feedback on my work from a new audience. The residency culminated in an artist talk.

  • Nedlands Emerge Youth Art

    Nedlands Emerge Youth Art

    My painting Dazzle won the 2017 Emerge: Nedlands Youth Art Awards.

    Dazzle
    2017
    Oil on canvas
    49 x 64 cm

  • Fine Arts at Hale

    Fine Arts at Hale

    My painting GWS won the 2017 Fine Art at Hale: 25th Anniversary Prize.

    GWS
    2017
    Oil on canvas
    64 x 86 cm

  • Curtin University Residency

    Curtin University Residency

    I had a four month residency at Curtin University earlier in the year, it was great to be making work in a communal studio environment again.

  • Bunbury Bienalle

    Bunbury Bienalle

    My painting Tawny was acquired by the Bunbury Regional Gallery, the work was exhibited during the 2017 Bunbury Biennale.


    Tawny (Details)
    2017
    Oil on Canvas
    120 x 148 cm.

  • Heysen prize for landscape

    Heysen prize for landscape

    My painting Gantheaume Point was selected for the Heysen Prize for Landscape held at the Hahndorf Academy in South Australia.

  • Ghost Fishers Art Award

    Ghost Fishers Art Award

    My work The Rare Albino Land Shark was selected for the Ghost Fishers Art Prize held at the Campbelltown Art Center in NSW from October to December 2016.

  • Town of Claremont Art Awards

    Town of Claremont Art Awards

    My painting Laser received a highly commended at the 2016 Town of Claremont Art Awards.

  • City of Busselton Art Award

    City of Busselton Art Award

    My painting Roof-Lizard received a High Commended at the 2016 City of Busselton Art Award.

  • Hale Art School Collection

    Hale Art School Collection

    My painting Mosaic is now in the Hale School Collection.

    Mosaic, 2016. Oil on canvas. 30 x 30 cm.

  • Albany Art Award

    Albany Art Award

    My painting Klix Klex was selected for the 2015 Albany Art Award at the Vancover Arts Centre.

    https://www.hugomichellgallery.com/news-exhibitions/richard-lewer-albany-art-prize-winner/

  • Bunbury Biennale

    Bunbury Biennale

    My painting Seeking the Umbrella was selected for the 2015 Bunbury Bienalle. The catalog for the show can be accessed here http://www.brag.org.au/component/phocadownload/category/1-bunbury-regional-art-galleries.html?download=24:bunbury-biennale-2015-catalogue

  • Art Angels purchase

    Art Angels purchase

    My painting Leisure Island was purchased by the Turner Galleries Art Angels.

  • Tyrant Lizard King, PS Art Space, Fremantle

    Tyrant Lizard King, PS Art Space, Fremantle

    My second solo show Tyrant Lizard King occurred in June 2015 at PS Art Space in Fremantle. The show explored painting as a means of recounting my experience with Spreepark, a deserted theme park in Berlin. Outsiders in biohazard suits, giant swans, fallen dinosaurs and motor vehicle in the form of a giant head are used to explore the fractured experience of contemporary tourist travel and our removal of first hand experiences.

  • Linden Postcard Show

    Linden Postcard Show

    My painting Removal was awarded third place in the 2014 Linden Postcard show held at the Linden Centre for Contemporary Art in St Kilda, Melbourne.

    http://lindenarts.org/exhibitions/the-linden-postcard-show--2014

  • Cream 5: Looking Through the Image Review

    Cream 5: Looking Through the Image Review

    Here is a copy of Gemma Weston's article inthe West Australian about my solo show Cream 5: Looking Through the Image at Emerge Art Space in 2013.

  • Looking through the Image, Emerge Art Space

    Looking through the Image, Emerge Art Space

    My first solo show ‘Looking through the Image’ opened on Wednesday the 24th of July 2013 at Emerge Art Space in Inglewood. The show runs until Wednesday the 23rd of August.

    http://www.emerge-art.com.au/exhibitions/category/cream_5_-_jarrad_martyn

  • Curtin University Art Collection

    Curtin University Art Collection

    My painting Ammonia is now part of the Curtin University Art Collection.

    Ammonia, 2013. Oil on canvas, 36 x 42 cm.

  • National Campus Art Award

    National Campus Art Award

    My painting Spectators won the 2013 National Campus Art Prize, held at Nexus Gallery in Adelaide.